Scientific Program

We expect to have an exciting and diverse scientific program across both the Australasian Evolution Society Conference and Phylomania. This includes three outstanding plenary speakers in the form of Professor Tobias Uller (University of Lund), Associate Professor Carla Sgro (Monash University) and Professor Craig Moritz (Australian National University). The full scientific program can be found below.

AES2017_Program

Plenary Speakers

Professor Tobias Uller (University of Lund)

Tobias

Tobias Uller is a Professor at Lund University  in Sweden. Tobias started his research career as a PhD student at the University of Gothenburg. Since then, Tobias has worked in a variety of institutes across the globe, including as a Wenner Gren Fellow at the University of Wollongong, a Fulbright Fellow at the University of Arizona and as a Royal Society Fellow at the University of Oxford (where he also held a departmental lectureship). In 2013, Tobias returned to Sweden to take up a Wallenberg Academy Fellowship at Lund.

Tobias’ research spans a wide range of areas within Evolutionary Biology but the majority of his current work focuses on trying to understand the causal role that development plays in evolution. His research covers a wide range of techniques from laboratory and field experiments, physiological and molecular methods to comparative, meta-analytical and theoretical approaches and is highly collaborative, integrating expertise from a wide range of disciplines (e.g., philosophy, computer science, medicine). Examples of Tobias’ current research projects include the adaptive significance of maternal effects, the causes and consequences of hybridization, non-genetic inheritance and the evolution of long-term effects of early life conditions. Check out more about Tobias’ research here.

Associate Professor Carla Sgro (Monash University)

Sgro

Carla Sgro is an Associate Professor at Monash University. Carla’s research career began as a PhD student at La Trobe University, supervised by Ary Hoffmann.  Following this she spent 3 years at University College London as a postdoc working with Linda Partridge before returning to Australia, initially on a University of Queensland Postdoctoral Fellowship before being awarded a series of ARC Research Fellowships.

Carla’s research focuses on incorporating evolutionary theory into understanding and predicting how species will respond to rapid environmental change. To achieve this, Carla integrates a wide variety of experimental approaches, including comparisons of populations collected from along environmental gradients, experimental evolution, as well as quantitative genetics and genomics. Her research has been fundamental in our understanding of the factors that constrain and facilitate responses to rapid environmental change as well as for thinking about how we can apply an understanding of evolutionary theory to real-world conservation and management issues. Check out more about Carla’s research here.

 

Professor Craig Moritz (Australian National University)

MoritzCraig2013

Craig Moritz is a professor at the Australian National University and director of the joint ANU/CSIRO Centre for Biodiversity Analysis. Craig began his research career as a PhD Student at the Australian National University. Since then he has worked in a variety of institutes both here and in the US, including being the Director of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at UC Berkeley between 2000 and 2012. In 2012 Craig returned to Australia and the ANU as an ARC Laureate Fellow.

Craig’s research utilises genomic, phylogenetic and environmental tools to study how current and historical population processes, at various spatial and temporal scales, have shaped patterns of biodiversity at multiple levels of biological organisation (from populations and phylogographic lineages to entire clades). Craig then uses this understanding of how species have responded to historical climatic events to help inform us about the best way to manage biological responses to current climate events. Check our more about Craig’s research here.

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